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Sunday 1 September: Trinity 11
Masses at 9 AM & 11 AM; EP at 5 PM


Tuesday 3 September: St. Gregory the Great
Mass at 7 PM


Wednesday 4 September: Feria
Mass at 10 AM


Sunday 8 September: Trinity 12
Masses at 9 AM & 11 AM; EP at 5 PM


Monday 9 September: The Birth of Our Lady
Mass at 7 PM


Tuesday 10 September: Feria
Mass at 7 PM


Wednesday 11 September: Feria
Mass at 10 AM


Saturday 14 September: HOLY CROSS
Mass at 7 PM


Sunday 15 September: Trinity 13
Masses at 9 AM & 11 AM; EP at 5 PM


Monday 16 September: St. Ninian
Mass at 7 PM


Tuesday 17 September: St. Hildegaard
Mass at 7 PM


Wednesday 18 September: Feria
Mass at 10 AM


Saturday 21 September: St. Matthew
Mass at 7 PM


Sunday 22 September: Trinity 14
Masses at 9 AM & 11 AM; EP at 5 PM


Tuesday 24 September: Feria
Mass at 7 PM


Wednesday 25 September: St. Finnbar of Caithness
Mass at 10 AM


Sunday 29 September: MICHAELMASS
Masses at 9 AM & 11 AM; EP at 5 PM

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Tuesday 1 October St. Gregory the Enlightener
Mass at 7 PM
Gregory is called ‘the Enlightener’ because
he brought the light of the Gospel to the
people of Armenia towards the end of the
third century. Of royal descent, he seems to
have become a Christian while in exile in
Cappadocia. Returning to Armenia, he
eventually converted King Tiridates to the
faith, which then became the official religion
of the kingdom – making Armenia the
first Christian country. Gregory was consecrated
Bishop (Katholikos) in Caesarea in
Cappadocia, and was succeeded by his son,
who attended the Council of Nicaea
.

Wednesday  2 October: Feria
Mass at 10 AM

Sunday 6 October: Trinity 16
Masses at 9 AM & 11 AM; EP at 5 PM


Tuesday 8 October: Alexander Penrose Forbes
Mass at 7 PM
Alexander Penrose Forbes was born in Edinburgh,
the son of Lord Medwyn, a judge
of the Court of Session. He served with the
East India Company for three years but returned
to Britain on health grounds and
studied at Brasenose College, Oxford.
There he was strongly influenced by the
Tractarian Pusey, who, after Forbes’ ordination,
appointed him to St Saviour’s, a
slum parish in Leeds, in 1847. A few
months later, aged thirty, he was elected
Bishop of Brechin, a diocese of eleven parishes,
one of which – in Dundee – Forbes
pastored himself. He exercised a notable
ministry among the poor and among the
victims of a cholera epidemic. He built the
present cathedral for his own congregation,
and founded several new congregations in
the city, including St Salvador’s. His doctrine
of the real presence of Christ in the
eucharist led to controversy and in 1860 to
a trial before his fellow bishops, at which
he was supported by John Keble. His Tractarian
theology had a growing influence
upon the Scottish Episcopal Church for the
rest of the century. His writings include
doctrinal and devotional works, as well as
research into the lives of the saints of Scotland.
He died in 1875.


Wednesday  9 October: Feria
Mass at 10 AM

Sunday 13 October Trinity 17
Masses at 9 AM & 11 AM; EP at 5 PM


Tuesday 15 October: St. Teresa of Avila
Mass at 7 PM
Teresa was born into an aristocratic Spanish
family in 1515. Following her mother’s
death, she was educated by Augustinian
nuns and then ran away from home to enter
a Carmelite convent when she was
twenty. After initial difficulties in prayer,
her intense mystical experiences attracted
many disciples. She was inspired to reform
the Carmelite rule and, assisted by St John
of the Cross, she travelled throughout
Spain founding many new religious houses
for men as well as women. Her writings
about her own spiritual life and progress in
prayer towards union with God include
‘The Way of Perfection’ and ‘The Interior
Castle’, which are still acclaimed. She knew
great physical suffering and died of exhaustion
on 4 October 1582. Her feast is on
15 October because the very day after her
death the reformed calendar was adopted
in Spain and elsewhere and eleven days
were omitted from October that year.


Wednesday  16 October: Feria
Mass at 10 AM

Friday 18 October: St. Luke
Mass at 7 PM
Luke is the author of the Gospel bearing his
name, and also of the Book of the Acts of
the Apostles. From Acts we learn that he
was a gentile convert to Christianity, a doctor,
who accompanied St Paul on his second
and third missionary journeys, and
who stayed in Rome with him while he was
in captivity. Eastern Christians credit St
Luke with having produced the first ikon.
He is thought to have died at the age of
eighty-four in Greece.


Sunday 20 October: Trinity 18
Masses at 9 AM & 11 AM; EP at 5 PM


Tuesday 22 October: Feria
Mass at 7 PM

Wednesday  23 October:  St. James of Jerusalem
Mass at 10 AM
James, ‘the Lord’s brother’, was a leader of
the Church in Jerusalem from a very early
date, and is regarded as its first bishop.
Though not one of the Twelve, St Paul includes
James among those to whom the
risen Lord appeared before the Ascension,
and records that James received him cordially
when he visited Jerusalem after his
conversion. James was regarded as the
leader of the Jewish community when the
Church expanded to embrace the Gentiles,
and was successful in bringing many of his
fellow Jews to faith in Christ. He presided
at the Council of Jerusalem. He is thought
to have been stoned to death around the
year 62.


Sunday 27 October: Trinity 19
Masses at 9 AM & 11 AM; EP at 5 PM

Monday 28 October: SS Simon and Jude
Mass at 7 PM
Simon and Jude were named among the
twelve apostles in the gospels of Matthew,
Mark and Luke. Simon is called ‘the
Zealot’, probably because he belonged to a
nationalist resistance movement opposing
Roman rule. Luke describes Jude as the son
of James, while the Letter of Jude has him
as the brother of James, neither of which
negates the other. It seems he is the same
person as Thaddaeus, which may have
been a last name. The two apostles are
joined together on 28 October because a
church which had recently acquired their
relics was dedicated in Rome on this day in
the seventh century.


Tuesday 29 October: James Hannington
Mass at 7 PM
James Hannington was born in 1847 of a
Congregationalist family but he became an
Anglican before going up to Oxford. He
was ordained and, after serving a curacy
for five years, went with the Church Missionary
Society to Uganda. He was consecrated
bishop for that part of Africa in 1884
and a year later, with European and indigenous
Christians, made a missionary journey
inland from Mombasa. The ruler of
Buganda, Mwanga, who despised Christians
because they refused to condone his
immoral practises, seized the whole party,
tortured them for several days and then
had them butchered on this day in 1885.


Wednesday  30 October: Feria
Mass at 10 AM

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